Memorial Day

On this Memorial Day, let us remember the many men and women in our country’s armed forces who made the ultimate sacrifice so that we can enjoy the freedoms we have today.

TRADITIONAL OBSERVANCE:

“On Memorial Day, the flag of the United States is raised briskly to the top of the staff and then solemnly lowered to the half-staff position, where it remains only until noon.[41] It is then raised to full-staff for the remainder of the day.[42]

The half-staff position remembers the more than one million men and women who gave their lives in service of their country. At noon, their memory is raised by the living, who resolve not to let their sacrifice be in vain, but to rise up in their stead and continue the fight for liberty and justice for all.”

 

“Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”            John 15:13

A Little Clarification

I just want to clarify that “MTHFR” does not mean what you think it does even though the expletive certainly applies to topical steroid withdrawal (TSW) and this hell that currently is our life.

Here’s a description from The Genetics Home Reference Guide.

What is the official name of the MTHFR gene?

The official name of this gene is “methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (NAD(P)H).”  MTHFR is the gene’s official symbol.

What is the normal function of the MTHFR gene?

The MTHFR gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. This enzyme plays a role in processing amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase is important for a chemical reaction involving forms of the B-vitamin folate (also called folic acid or vitamin B9). Specifically, this enzyme converts 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate. This reaction is required for the multistep process that converts the amino acid homocysteine to another amino acid, methionine. The body uses methionine to make proteins and other important compounds.

MethyleneTetraHydroFolate Reductase?  The expletive rolls off the tongue much easier….